Sports Medicine Research: In the Lab & In the Field (Sports Med Res)

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Wednesday, July 18, 2018

When You Lift That Water Cooler, Lift with Your Legs, Not Your Back

Work related injury and management strategies among certified athletic trainer’s

Kucera KL, Lipscomb HJ, Roos KG, Dement JM, and Hootman JM. J Athl Training. 2018. [Epub Ahead of Print].

Take Home Message: Approximately 12% of athletic trainers reported an injury during the prior 12 months and most modified their work but never reported a workers’ compensation claim.

https://flic.kr/p/cHefvS
Athletic training can be a physically demanding job; however, we know little about work-related injuries among athletic trainers and how these injuries are reported and managed. Therefore, Kucera and colleagues completed a cross-sectional study to determine the self-reported prevalence and incidence of work-related injuries of athletic trainers.
Tuesday, July 17, 2018

Nonoperative treatment of muscle injuries - recommendations from the GOTS expert meeting

Nonoperative treatment of muscle injuries - recommendations from the GOTS expert meeting

T. Hotfiel, R. Seil, W. Bily, W. Bloch, A. Gokeler, R. M. Krifter, F. Mayer, P. Ueblacker, L. Weisskopf and M. Engelhardt. Journal of Experimental Orthopaedics 2018 5:24.

The German-Austrian-Swiss Society for Orthopaedic Traumatologic Sports Medicine (GOTS) initiated the 2016 Expert Meeting to focus on muscle and tendon injuries. The statement covers primary care and initial treatment (e.g., protection/rest, ice), treatment strategies (e.g., injection therapy, rehabilitation, oral medication),


Monday, July 16, 2018

Mid-Life Ankle Crisis with Chronic Ankle Instability

Health-related quality of life is decreased in middle-aged adults with chronic ankle instability 

Simon JE, Docherty CL. J Sci Med Sport. Epub ahead of print 24 May 2018.
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1440244018301427

Take Home Message: Middle-aged adults with chronic ankle instability (CAI) report impaired regional and global function compared to healthy controls. Healthcare providers can use questionnaires to identify patients with perceived functional deficits and lower quality of life. 


Healthcare providers increasingly rely on patient-reported outcomes to assess a patient’s perception of their recovery and quality of life after an injury. While it is well documented among young adults that chronic ankle instability (CAI) relates to a lower quality of life, it is unclear how CAI may relate to quality of life among middle-aged adults (> 40 years old). Therefore, the researchers assessed if health-related quality of life differed between middle-aged adults with and without CAI.
Thursday, July 12, 2018

The NBA and Youth Basketball: Recommendations for Promoting a Healthy and Positive Experience


The NBA and Youth Basketball: Recommendations for Promoting a Healthy and Positive Experience.

DiFiori JP, Güllich A, Brenner JS, Côté J, Hainline B, Ryan E 3rd, Malina RM. Sports Med. 2018 Jun 30. doi: 10.1007/s40279-018-0950-0. [Epub ahead of print]

The National Basketball Association and USA Basketball asked a group of experts to comment on the existing research regarding youth sports participation and the related health, performance, and psychosocial outcomes. They also offered age-specific recommendations for basketball participation to help promote a healthy and positive experience for young players. The document covers various topics including the epidemiology of injuries in basketball, injury prevention, sport specialization, as well as growth and maturation.


Wednesday, July 11, 2018

Time Doesn’t Heal All Wounds, Specifically Post ACL

Changes in KOOS and WOMAC Scores in a Young Athletic Populations With and Without Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

Antosh I, Svoboda SJ, Peck KY, Garcia EG, & Cameron KL. Am J Sports Med. 2018; 46(7): 1606-1616.  DOI: 10.1177/0363546518768753
           
Take Home Message: Students at a US service academy with an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction tend to report poorer patient-reported outcomes at 2 years post reconstruction than healthy uninjured peers. 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/west_point/4751423269
Most patients after an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction experience a near-full recovery of functional outcomes. However, many of these patients fail to return to preinjury activity levels and report lingering knee symptoms.  It is challenging to interpret these lingering symptoms without knowing how patients were doing prior to injury.  Hence, these authors conducted a prospective study to compare patient-reported outcomes between students at a US service academy with and without an ACL injury. 
Tuesday, July 10, 2018

2018 Consensus statement on exercise therapy and physical interventions (orthoses, taping and manual therapy) to treat patellofemoral pain: recommendations from the 5th International Patellofemoral Pain Research Retreat, Gold Coast, Australia, 2017.


2018 Consensus statement on exercise therapy and physical interventions (orthoses, taping and manual therapy) to treat patellofemoral pain: recommendations from the 5th International Patellofemoral Pain Research Retreat, Gold Coast, Australia, 2017.

Collins NJ, Barton CJ, van Middelkoop M, Callaghan MJ, Rathleff MS, Vicenzino BT, Davis IS, Powers CM, Macri EM, Hart HF, de Oliveira Silva D, Crossley KM. Br J Sports Med. 2018 Jun 20. pii: bjsports-2018-099397. doi: 10.1136/bjsports-2018-099397. [Epub ahead of print]

This consensus statement is the 5th International Patellofemoral Research Retreat (see related links below) and focuses on exercise therapy and physical interventions (for example, orthoses, manual therapy) for patellofemoral pain. “Recommendations from the expert panel support the use of exercise therapy (especially the combination of hip-focused and knee-focused exercises), combined interventions and foot orthoses to improve pain and/or function in people with patellofemoral pain. The use of patellofemoral, knee or lumbar mobilisations in isolation, or electrophysical agents, is not recommended. There is uncertainty regarding the use of patellar taping/bracing, acupuncture/dry needling, manual soft tissue techniques, blood flow restriction training and gait retraining in patients with patellofemoral pain.”





Monday, July 9, 2018

Novel Clinical Prediction Rule for Patellofemoral Rehabilitation

Treatment Success of Hip and Core or Knee Strengthening for Patellofemoral Pain: Development of Clinical Prediction Rules.

Earl-Boehm JE, Bolgla LA, Emory C, Hamstra-Wright KL, Tarima S, Ferber R. J Athl Train. 2018. [Epub ahead of print]

Take Home Message: Pain, demographics, and hip and core strength or endurance (ability to hold a plank position) may help predict which patients with patellofemoral pain will improve after a hip/core or knee strengthening program.

http://doa.alaska.gov/drb/alaskaCare/employee/wellness/exercise.html
Clinicians can use clinical prediction rules to identify patients who are likely to respond to a specific rehabilitation program. Numerous factors (for example, weak hip and knee strength, limited hip range of motion) may cause patellofemoral pain syndrome, which can make it challenging for a clinician to select an optimal treatment strategy. No investigators have included hip or pelvic measurements into a clinical prediction model for success after rehabilitation program. Therefore, the authors developed a clinical prediction rule that incorporated clinically measurable factors (age, sex, weight, hip strength, posterior core endurance, iliotibial band flexibility) to predict positive outcomes after hip and core or knee strengthening programs for individuals with patellofemoral pain.