Sports Medicine Research: In the Lab & In the Field (Sports Med Res)
Friday, June 24, 2016

2016 consensus statement of the International Ankle Consortium: prevalence, impact and long-term consequences of lateral ankle sprains

2016 consensus statement of the International Ankle Consortium: prevalence, impact and long-term consequences of lateral ankle sprains

Phillip A Gribble, Chris M Bleakley, Brian M Caulfield, Carrie L Docherty, François Fourchet, Daniel Tik-Pui Fong, Jay Hertel, Claire E Hiller, Thomas W Kaminski, Patrick O McKeon, Kathryn M Refshauge, Evert A Verhagen, Bill T Vicenzino, Erik A Wikstrom, Eamonn Delahunt. Br J Sports Med doi:10.1136/bjsports-2016-096188

“The Executive Committee of the International Ankle Consortium presents this 2016 position paper with recommendations for information implementation and continued research based on the paradigm that lateral ankle sprain (LAS), and the development of chronic ankle instability (CAI), serve as a conduit to a significant global healthcare burden.” The document was paired with an evidence review for the 2016 International Ankle Consortium Consensus Statement.

Wednesday, June 22, 2016

2016 Consensus Statement on Return to Sport from the First World Congress in Sports Physical Therapy, Bern.

2016 Consensus statement on return to sport from the First World Congress in Sports Physical Therapy, Bern.

Ardern CL, Glasgow P, Schneiders A, Witvrouw E, Clarsen B, Cools A, Gojanovic B, Griffin S, Khan KM, Moksnes H, Mutch SA, Phillips N, Reurink G, Sadler R, Grävare Silbernagel K, Thorborg K, Wangensteen A, Wilk KE, Bizzini M. Br J Sports Med. 2016 May 25. pii: bjsports-2016-096278. doi: 10.1136/bjsports-2016-096278. [Epub ahead of print]

The First World Congress in Sports Physical Therapy aimed “to present the current evidence and guidelines in areas where sports medicine clinicians (particularly physiotherapists and physicians) play a major role in helping athletes RTS [return to sport] after injury or surgery”. The document includes 4 main sections: defining return to sport, models to help understand and guide the return to sport process, what evidence do we have to inform to inform the clinician’s contribution to the shared return to sport decision, and return to sport research priorities and future directions.

Monday, June 20, 2016

Athletes Are Open to Genetic Testing and Are Willing to Share Results

Student-Athletes’ Views on APOE Genotyping for Increased Risk of Poor Recovery after a Traumatic Brain Injury

Hercher LS., Caudle M., Griffin J., Herzog M., Matviychuk D., Tidwell J. J Genet Cousel. 2016; ahead of print

Take Home Message: Despite a number of concerns many athletes responded with substantial interest and little resistance to the idea of genetic testing for the purpose of risk assessment for prolonged concussion recovery and late onset Alzheimer’s disease.

Medical professionals could use prognostic indicators to identify athletes who are at risk of poor recovery after a concussion. High-risk patients could then receive individualized treatment and advice on return to play. The apolipoprotein (APOE) e4 allele (genetic variation) is associated with late-onset Alzheimer’s disease as well as poor recovery and worse outcome after a brain injury. To date, there are no studies that addressed whether athletes have any interest in genetic testing or the extent to which the results would change the athlete’s athletic-career decisions. Therefore, the authors created a 38-item questionnaire to assess student-athletes’ interest in genetic testing to determine their risk of poor recovery from concussion and risk for late-onset Alzheimer’s disease.
Friday, June 17, 2016

2016 Patellofemoral pain consensus statement from the 4th International Patellofemoral Pain Research Retreat, Manchester. Part 2: recommended physical interventions (exercise, taping, bracing, foot orthoses and combined interventions)

2016 Patellofemoral pain consensus statement from the 4th International Patellofemoral Pain Research Retreat, Manchester. Part 2: recommended physical interventions (exercise, taping, bracing, foot orthoses and combined interventions)

Crossley KM, van Middelkoop M, Callaghan MJ, Collins NJ, Rathleff MS, Barton CJ. Br J Sports Med. 2016 May 31. pii: bjsports-2016-096268. doi: 10.1136/bjsports-2016-096268. [Epub ahead of print]

The International Patellofemoral Pain Research Retreat in Manchester released a consensus statement based on evidence published between 2010 and June 2015. After discussing 24 statements the group agreed to 6 recommendations: 2 related to exercise therapy, 1 related to combined interventions, 1 related to foot orthoses, and 2 related to other adjunctive interventions.

Wednesday, June 15, 2016

Return to Sport and BMI are Associated with Quality of Life After an ACL Reconstruction

Return to sport matters – longer-term quality of life after ACL reconstruction in people with knee difficulties.

Filbay SR., Ackerman IN, Russell TG, and Crossley KM. Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2016. [Epub Ahead of Print].

Take Home Message: Lower overall quality of life after an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction was associated with higher body mass index (BMI) and not returning to sport.

Despite new techniques to treat an ACL rupture, many patients report long-term impairments in quality of life. Clinicians could provide care to reduce the risk of poor outcomes if clinicians knew which factors related to poor long-term outcomes. Hence, Filbay and colleagues completed a cross-sectional study to identify the factors related to quality of life 5 to 20 years after ACL reconstruction.
Monday, June 13, 2016

What Should Athletes do to Minimize Risk of Reinjury After ACL Reconstruction Surgery?

Simple decision rules can reduce reinjury risk by 84% after ACL reconstruction: the Delaware-Oslo ACL cohort study

Grindem H, Snyder-Mackler L, Moksnes H, Engebretsen L, Risberg MA. Br J Sports Med. 2016 May 9:bjsports-2016.doi:10.1136/bjsports-2016-096031
http://bjsm.bmj.com/content/early/2016/05/08/bjsports-2016-096031.short

Take Home Message: Athletes who wait at least 9 months after an anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction and/or regain quadriceps strength compared with the uninjured limb may be at lower risk for reinjury than those who fail to meet these criteria.

Despite advances in treating an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, a patient after a recent ACL reconstruction is at risk for reinjury. A reinjury could increase an athlete’s risk for long-term knee disability and pain. It is unclear if delaying a return to sport or requiring a higher level of knee function prior to return to sport may reduce the risk of reinjury. Hence, Grindem et al. assessed if the 2-year risk of knee reinjury after an ACL reconstruction was associated with either timing or knee function when returning to jumping, pivoting, and cutting sports.
Friday, June 10, 2016

National Strength and Conditioning Association Position Statement on Long-Term Athletic Development

National Strength and Conditioning Association Position Statement on Long-Term Athletic Development

Lloyd RS, Cronin JB, Faigenbaum AD, Haff GG, Howard R, Kraemer WJ, Micheli LJ, Myer GD, Oliver JL. J Strength Cond Res. 2016 Jun;30(6):1491-509. doi: 10.1519/JSC.0000000000001387.

The National Strength and Conditioning Association has released a position statement related to long-term athletic development. The goal of the authors was “to critically synthesize existing literature and current practices within the field and to compose a relevant position statement…. A list of 10 pillars of successful long-term athletic development are presented, which summarize the key recommendations…. With these pillars in place, it is believed that the NSCA can (a) help foster a more unified and holistic approach to long-term athletic development, (b) promote the benefits of a lifetime of healthy physical activity, and (c) prevent and/or minimize injuries from sports participation for all boys and girls.”