Sports Medicine Research: In the Lab & In the Field: SMR Brief: Hip Strengthening May Improve Contralateral Balance (Sports Med Res)
Thursday, July 14, 2011

SMR Brief: Hip Strengthening May Improve Contralateral Balance

The effect of contralateral training: Influence of unilateral isokinetic exercise on one-legged standing balance of the contralateral lower extremity in adults.

Kim K, Cha YJ, Fell DW. Gait Posture. 2011 May;34(1):103-6.

The randomized clinical trial (32 healthy adults) indicated that 2 weeks of unilateral isokinetic hip strengthening (flexion/extension and abduction/adduction) could improve single leg balance on the opposite leg. This study raises several interesting questions but also provides support for encouraging our patients to continue strengthening exercises for the opposite leg while out with an injury.

5 comments:

JT Podell said...

Even though this post is small, there is a great point described here. Seeing more and more studies come out with this cross over affect that is being shown to take place by exercising unilaterally or with the unaffected leg and then after a certain time period there was also an increase in strength in the affected limb. I will use this information more and more and show to other clinicians who do not believe in this cross over phenomenom and that it has actually been shown to be affective. Thank you.

Jeffrey B. Driban, PhD, ATC, CSCS said...

Thanks JT! One of my pet peeves is hearing someone say they were told not to strength train b/c they are injured. If you're knee is hurt you still have three good extremities and there's growing evidence that we can gain some cross-over benefits. Even without a cross-over benefit, strengthening/exercising the contralateral limb (and the rest of the body) can help us treat the entire patient...physically and mentally.

Maya Chang said...

This could be also applied in rehabilitation setting for emphasizing the importance of conditioning uninjured limb not only to maintain patient’s fitness level but also to possibly improve the strength/stability of injured side by training contralateral side. To examine the effects of cross/contralateral training in rehab setting, further studies dealing with subjects who are injured on one side of their limb are required.

Maya Chang said...

This could be also applied in rehabilitation setting for emphasizing the importance of conditioning uninjured limb not only to maintain patient’s fitness level but also to possibly improve the strength/stability of injured side by training contralateral side. To examine the effects of cross/contralateral training in rehab setting, further studies dealing with subjects who are injured on one side of their limb are required.

Jeffrey Driban said...

Maya, you are absolutely correct.
You may be interested in these posts that also examined this idea...
http://www.sportsmedres.org/2014/11/cross-education-strength-and-activation-knee.html
http://www.sportsmedres.org/2011/07/cross-education-of-strengthening-during.html

Post a Comment

When you submit a comment please click 'Subscribe by Email" (just below the comments) or "Subscribe to: Post Comments (Atom)" (at the bottom of this page) if you would like to receive a notification when another comment has been submitted to this post.

Please note that if you are using Safari and have problems submitting comments you may need to go to your preferences (privacy tab) and stop blocking third party cookies. Sorry for any inconvenience this may pose.